The Goetia Demons

The demons of modern magick began with demonology classifications by Johann Wier in the mid-1500s, with Collin de Plancy’s illustrated Dictionnaire Infernal in 1863, and with a 17th century grimoire called the Goetia. Golden Dawn member, SL MacGregor Mathers, translated and compiled the list of Goetic demons in 1904.

Below are four classic books on demons and demonology from the late 16th century to 20th century.

Pseudomonarchia daemonum (1583) -Reginald Scot’s translation of Johann Wier’s text

Pseudomonarchia Daemonum, or Hierarchy of Demons first appears as an Appendix to Johann Weyer’s De praestigiis daemonum (1577). The title of the book translates roughly to “false monarchy of demons”.

An abridgement of a grimoire similar in nature to the Ars Goetia, the first book of The Lesser Key of Solomon, it contains a list of demons, and the appropriate hours and rituals to conjure them.

The book was written before The Lesser Key of Solomon, and has some differences. There are sixty-nine demons listed (instead of seventy-two), and the order of the spirits varies, as well as some of their characteristics. The demons Vassago, Seere, Dantalion and Andromalius are not listed in this book, while Pruflas is not listed in The Lesser Key of Solomon.

Pseudomonarchia Daemonum does not attribute seals to the demons, as The Lesser Key of Solomon does.

Weyer referred to his source manuscript as Liber officiorum spirituum, seu Liber dictus Empto. Salomonis, de principibus et regibus daemoniorum. (Book of the offices of spirits, or the book called ‘Empto’. Solomon, concerning the princes and kings of demons). This work is likely related to a very similar 1583 manuscript titled The Office of Spirits, both of which appear ultimately be an elaboration on a fifteenth-century manuscript titled Le Livre des Esperitz (of which 30 of its 47 spirits are nearly identical to spirits in the Ars Goetia).

Dictionnaire Infernal (1863) – Collin de Plancy’s book of demons & illustrations

The Dictionnaire Infernal is a book on demonology, describing demons organized in hierarchies. It was written by Jacques Auguste Simon Collin de Plancy and first published in 1818. There were several editions of the book; perhaps the most famous is the 1863 edition, which included sixty-nine illustrations by Louis Le Breton depicting the appearances of several of the demons. Many but not all of these images were later used in S. L. MacGregor Mathers’s edition of The Lesser Key of Solomon.

Abramelin The Mage (1898) – 15th century Hebrew work offering a hierarchy of demons

The Book of Abramelin tells the story of an Egyptian mage named Abraham or Abra-Melin, who taught a system of magic to Abraham of Worms, a Jew in Worms, Germany, presumed to have lived from c.1362–c.1458.

The system of magic from this book regained popularity in the 19th and 20th centuries due to the efforts of Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers’ translation, The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, its import within the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and later within the mystical system of Thelema (created in 1904 by Aleister Crowley).

Goetic Demons (1904) – Mather’s translation of the Lesser Key of Solomon the King

The Goetia is Book 1 of the Lemegeton (Lesser Key of Solomon), a grimoire that circulated in the 17th century and is penned in the name of King Solomon. This translation/compilation comes from SL MacGregor Mathers in 1904.

The 72 Demons of the Goetia

  1. King Bael (or BEELZEBUB)
  2. Duke Agares
  3. Prince Vassago
  4. Marquis Samigina
  5. President Barbas
  6. Duke Valefar
  7. Marquis Aamon
  8. Duke Barbatos
  9. King Paimon
  10. President Buer
  11. Duke Gusion
  12. Prince Sitri
  13. King Beleth
  14. Marquis Leraje
  15. Duke Eligos
  16. Duke Zepar
  17. Count/President Botis
  18. Duke Bathin
  19. Duke Sallos
  20. King Purson
  21. Count/President Marax
  22. Count/Prince Ipos
  23. Duke Aim
  24. Marquis Naberius
  25. Count/President Glasya-Labolas
  26. Duke Buné
  27. Marquis/Count Ronové
  28. Duke Berith
  29. Duke Astaroth
  30. Marquis Forneus
  31. President Foras
  32. King Asmodeus
  33. Prince/President Gäap
  34. Count Furfur
  35. Marquis Marchosias
  36. Prince Stolas
  37. Marquis Phenex
  38. Count Halphas
  39. President Malphas
  40. Count Räum
  41. Duke Focalor
  42. Duke Vepar
  43. Marquis Sabnock
  44. Marquis Shax
  45. King/Count Viné
  46. Count Bifrons
  47. Duke Vual
  48. President Häagenti
  49. Duke Crocell
  50. Knight Furcas
  51. King Balam
  52. Duke Allocer
  53. President Camio
  54. Duke/Count Murmur
  55. Prince Orobas
  56. Duke Gremory
  57. President Ose
  58. President Amy
  59. Marquis Orias
  60. Duke Vapula
  61. King/President Zagan
  62. President Valac
  63. Marquis Andras
  64. Duke Flauros
  65. Marquis Andrealphus
  66. Marquis Kimaris
  67. King Amdusias
  68. King Belial
  69. Marquis Decarabia
  70. Prince Seere
  71. Duke Dantalion
  72. Count Andromalius
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